Parents Universal Resource Experts – Sue Scheff: Ungrateful Teens

bookparentingsolutionsAs part of my continuing series of Dr. Michele Borba’s insights and sneak peeks inside her Big Book of Parenting Solutions, we will review signs and symptoms of an ungrateful child.  This is Part (2).

•Bad manners: needs constant reminders to say thank you or show his appreciation
•Envy: wants what others have, envies others’ possessions
•Lack of appreciation: takes for granted your daily kind and thoughtful gestures
•Huge sense of entitlement: feels he deserves to have luxuries or privileges
•Dissatisfaction: always seems to want “more,” better,” or “new”
•Materialism: values only material things, brand names, or the “latest”
•Self-centeredness: is unwilling to reciprocate with gifts or kind acts to others
•Ungraciousness: acts disappointed with presents, blurts out “I didn’t want this”
•Thoughtlessness: doesn’t consider other person’s feelings or the thought or effort that went into her gesture

THE SOLUTION:

Step 1. Early Prevention

•Model gratitude.
Kids learn by seeing others display appreciation in everyday, unplanned moments. How often do your kids see you convey your appreciation with hugs, words, or small notes to others? (Much more on page 226 in Big Book of Parenting Solutions).
•Set limits. Having too much “stuff” squelches appreciation. (Read more on page 226 in Big Book of Parenting Solutions).

Michele Borba offers three more beneficial steps with much detail in her Big Book of Parenting Solutions. These are some sneak peeks and hopefully you will see the value in owning a book of this magnitude in your parenting library.

Next sneak peek: The Seven Deadly Parenting Styles don’t miss this!

For those that don’t have time to read, this is the perfect book for you since it is not the type of book you  sit down to read. As parenting questions come up, you can go straight to the index and find the page number. Immediately you will see the pages divided by boxes, quick tips and advice and easy to read and understand resources.  Did I mention she also gives you proven research and statistics?

Previous sneak peek: Part (1) Gratitude Recipes: Big Book of Parenting Solutions,   Part (3) Seven Deadly Parently Styles

Click here for more articles on parenting. Don’t forget to subscribe to my latest articles, and you won’t miss the sneak peeks inside this valuable book as well as other great tips, resources and stories.

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Parents Universal Resource Experts – Sue Scheff – Teen Entitlement Issues

spoiledteensDoes your teen have Entitlement Issues? 

Does your teen expect more from you than they have earned or deserve? 

Many parents only want the best for their children (usually more than they had growing up), but has this actually backfired on families? 

In today’s society many teens have major entitlement issues.  Many parents feel that giving their teen’s material items will somehow earn them respect.  Quite frankly, the opposite occurs in most families.  The more we give, the more our children expect and the less they respect us.  We literally lose ourselves in buying our children’s love.  At the end of the day, no one wins and life is a constant battle of anger, hopelessness, and debt. 

While interviewing a young teen, she was given a new car – brand new – felt she deserved it since her parents gave her two used ones previously.  She is only 17 years old and already controlling her household and believes she was entitled to this car. She shows no appreciation or respect to her parents.  Simply, she deserved it.   Can you imagine owning 3 cars by the age of 17, yet never buying one?  This is an extreme example, but I am sure many parents can relate. 

Entitlement issues can lead to serious problems.  Teaching your child respect and responsibility should be priority.  Although the issues may have started to escalate, as a parent, it is never too late to take control of the situation and say “no” when your teen feels they are entitled to a frivolous item or anything that is considered a privilege. 

Life is about responsibility, as parents we need to teach our children responsibility – helping our children comes natural to us, however when it becomes excessive and the child doesn’t appreciate it, it is time to step back and evaluate your situation.

Visit www.helpyourteens.com

Parents Universal Resource Experts – Sue Scheff – Teen Entitlement Issues

Does your teen have Entitlement Issues?

Does your teen expect more from you than they have earned or deserve?

Many parents only want the best for their children (usually more than they had growing up), but has this actually backfired on families?

In today’s society many teens have major entitlement issues. Many parents feel that giving their teen’s material items will somehow earn them respect. Quite frankly, the opposite occurs in most families. The more we give, the more our children expect and the less they respect us. We literally lose ourselves in buying our children’s love. At the end of the day, no one wins and life is a constant battle of anger, hopelessness, and debt.

While interviewing a young teen, she was recently given a new car – brand new – felt she deserved it since her parents gave her two used ones previously. She is only 17 years old and already controlling her household and believes she was entitled to this car. She shows no appreciation or respect to her parents. Simply, she deserved it. Can you imagine owning 3 cars by the age of 17, yet never buying one? This is an extreme example, but I am sure many parents can relate.

Entitlement issues can lead to serious problems. Teaching your child respect and responsibility should be priority. Although the issues may have started to escalate, as a parent, it is never too late to take control of the situation and say “no” when your teen feels they are entitled to a frivolous item or anything that is considered a privilege.

Life is about responsibility, as parents we need to teach our children responsibility – helping our children comes natural to us, however when it becomes excessive and the child doesn’t appreciate it, it is time to step back and evaluate your situation.

Learn more at www.helpyourteens.com